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San Diego, CA – April 14, 2014 - This past weekend, the San Diego Air & Space Museum launched its second annual Fly Your Ride! Competition. Ten scholarship prizes were awarded to winners in each category, a total of $2,600. Middle school and high school teams from all over San Diego County worked tirelessly over the span of six months to design and build flying cars. Their final products were tested to see if they could jump over an ever-increasing gap after going down a ramp.

"The variety of entries was outstanding," said Francis French, the Museum’s director of education. "Faced with the exact same challenge, these kids came up with such an imaginative variety of designs. The creativity they showed was incredible! After this year’s huge response we are looking forward to expanding the competition next year, rewarding even more creativity here in our community." 

Congratulations to 2014’s Fly Your Ride winners:

Middle School

Creativity Prize of $150 - Sebastian Eisenbach and (not pictured) Gregory Martin - Marshall Middle School 

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Creativity Prize of $150 - Brandon Matsumoto and (not pictured) Avi Martin - Lewis Middle School image

3rd Place Distance Prize of $150 - Jared Ellis - Marshall Middle School 

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2nd Place Distance Prize of $350 - Benjamin Ruhl - Marshall Middle School 

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1st Place Distance Prize of $500 - Sydney Stone, Sarah Channel, and Evelyn Tat - San Elijo Middle School 

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High School

Creativity Prize of $150 – Whitney Francis, Sarah Guha-Roy, and (not pictured) Gracie Young and Nitika Jain – La Jolla High School image

Creativity Prize of $150 – Christian Connor O’Connell, Tanya Agrawal, and Mykah Marks – Mission Hills High School 

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3rd Place Distance Prize of $150 – (not pictured) Beckett Browning and Jason Rich – High Tech High International

2nd Place Distance Prize of $350 – Ben Dinklage and (not pictured) Jonathan Martinez and Evan Graye - High Tech High International

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1st Place Distance Prize of $500 – Becca Myers, Killian Henson, Teris Jennings, and Raphael Carrasquillo - High Tech High International 

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“Many strange thoughts have been coming in my head all day. … How strange it was for me to be there. I, who a little more than a year ago never even dreamed of France. I was in a lecture room full of officers and soldiers participating in this war and I was one of them. That is the wonderful part of it, that I should be there as one of France’s soldiers.” 
From the diary of Horace Clyde Balsley, an American serving with the Lafayette Escadrille during WWI in France, October 30, 1915. Capt. Horace Clyde Balsley (1893–1942) was the first American whose plane was shot down during World War I, in effect, the first American pilot to be shot down in aerial combat. The Lafayette Escadrille was a French fighter squadron mostly comprised of American volunteers to aid France. The group hoped to encourage the United States to abandon neutrality. We have more than just photos in our archives. We have entire stories. Learn more about Horace Clyde Balsley and others on our Collections page.

“Many strange thoughts have been coming in my head all day. … How strange it was for me to be there. I, who a little more than a year ago never even dreamed of France. I was in a lecture room full of officers and soldiers participating in this war and I was one of them. That is the wonderful part of it, that I should be there as one of France’s soldiers.”

From the diary of Horace Clyde Balsley, an American serving with the Lafayette Escadrille during WWI in France, October 30, 1915. Capt. Horace Clyde Balsley (1893–1942) was the first American whose plane was shot down during World War I, in effect, the first American pilot to be shot down in aerial combat. The Lafayette Escadrille was a French fighter squadron mostly comprised of American volunteers to aid France. The group hoped to encourage the United States to abandon neutrality.

We have more than just photos in our archives. We have entire stories. Learn more about Horace Clyde Balsley and others on our Collections page.

While only 40hp, without any mufflers or means to help quiet or soften the roar of an engine, early pilots might have done any number of things to protect their ears. See the fellow on the right? That’s one way…
Original photo taken at the Curtiss School in San Diego, March 10, 1911. From the albums of Ray Fife, who, in 1963, built a reproduction Curtiss Pusher Biplane.

While only 40hp, without any mufflers or means to help quiet or soften the roar of an engine, early pilots might have done any number of things to protect their ears. See the fellow on the right? That’s one way…

Original photo taken at the Curtiss School in San Diego, March 10, 1911. From the albums of Ray Fife, who, in 1963, built a reproduction Curtiss Pusher Biplane.

Theodore “Spunds” Ellyson, (1885-1928), the first US Navy officer designated as an aviator. Notes on the image (the original photo was taken around 1911) were placed there by Ray Fife, who, in 1963, built a reproduction Curtiss Pusher Biplane. The album this photograh is from documents the building of the aircraft and also contains photos used to research the project.

Theodore “Spunds” Ellyson, (1885-1928), the first US Navy officer designated as an aviator. Notes on the image (the original photo was taken around 1911) were placed there by Ray Fife, who, in 1963, built a reproduction Curtiss Pusher Biplane. The album this photograh is from documents the building of the aircraft and also contains photos used to research the project.

The interior of a Convair 880 for TWA, staged for a publicity photo on January 8, 1958. Later, this section of the aircraft would be turned into the first class cabin.

The interior of a Convair 880 for TWA, staged for a publicity photo on January 8, 1958. Later, this section of the aircraft would be turned into the first class cabin.

Ever feel like your day is a bit… topsy-turvy?
Photo from the National Air Race, Inglewood, CA. c. 1930.

Ever feel like your day is a bit… topsy-turvy?

Photo from the National Air Race, Inglewood, CA. c. 1930.

From a group of photographs depicting Russian women pilots during World War II. We are always learning about the pieces in our archives and always welcome more information. For a series of portraits and images of these women pilots of World War II, see our Flickr page! 

From a group of photographs depicting Russian women pilots during World War II.

We are always learning about the pieces in our archives and always welcome more information. For a series of portraits and images of these women pilots of World War II, see our Flickr page

Open wide. 
A Douglas C-124 Globemaster II, affectionately nicknamed “Old Shaky”, was a heavy-lift cargo aircraft built in Long Beach, California. It primarily saw use during the 1950s and 1960s.

Open wide. 

A Douglas C-124 Globemaster II, affectionately nicknamed “Old Shaky”, was a heavy-lift cargo aircraft built in Long Beach, California. It primarily saw use during the 1950s and 1960s.

1927 - the USS Langley (CV-1) is practicing maneuvers with a smokescreen. Named after American astronomer, physicist, inventor, and aviation pioneer Samuel Langley, it was the US Navy’s first aircraft carrier. 
Photo from the J.M.F. Haase collection.

1927 - the USS Langley (CV-1) is practicing maneuvers with a smokescreen. Named after American astronomer, physicist, inventor, and aviation pioneer Samuel Langley, it was the US Navy’s first aircraft carrier. 


Photo from the J.M.F. Haase collection.

We’re starting February off with a bang! All of this is going on February 1!

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